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Top Stories by Coach Wei

AjaxWord (www.ajaxword.com) is an open source Web-based word processor. It closely mimics Microsoft Word in both look-and-feel and functionality. The application was initially written between 1997 and 1999 using JavaScript/DHTML on the client side with ASP on the server side. It was released on the Web in 2000. In 2005, the application's server-side logic was migrated to Java and released as open source code. On the client side, the application looks and feels like a typical desktop application, e.g., Microsoft Word. The design features the kind of rich graphical user interface that Microsoft Word users are familiar with, such as hierarchical menus, toolbars, wizards, file dialogs, and a multiple document interface (MDI). (Figure 1) On the server side, the application is a typical Java-based Web application. It features: User authentication and authorization. User-... (more)

Coach Wei's "Direct From Web 2.0" Blog: Web 2.0 – the State of Confusion?

My readers probably know that I am excited about Web 2.0 and have been a champion for it for many years. Six years ago, I started a company (Nexaweb) providing software for building Enterprise Web 2.0 solutions because I was convinced that Web 1.0 has a lot of limitations and the world would need the next generation. The goal of Nexaweb was to enable the next-generation Web. Despite the fact that Nexaweb has been quietly deployed at over 5,000 enterprises, I did not hear a single customer inquiry about “Web 2.0”  between 2000 and 2004. Of course I didn't predict the "... (more)

Why Web Applications Can be Problematic and Unreliable

It's no surprise that the common perception is that Web applications are unreliable and problematic. Users often experience "404," "resource unavailable," and "network unavailable" errors or even a mysterious application error telling them to "retry the application later." The truth is, a fundamental source of all these problems is the HTTP communication layer of the Web. The Internet was initially designed for presenting and sharing hyperlinked documents in the form of Web pages. Therefore, the communication layer is based on the HTTP "Request/Response" model, which adequately ... (more)

Java or .NET? XML Rich-Client AJAX Technology Brings Zero-Install Rich Client To Java

This article originally appeard in Java Developer's Journal on October 10, 2005 Which platform to use Java or .NET? Developers ask this question all the time. Java has been widely adopted because of its overwhelming benefits on the server side, but Java has less to offer on the client side. .NET has made inroads into the enterprise by leveraging its stronger rich-client capabilities. An alternative solution for enterprise-scale Internet application development is the emerging XML-based rich-client technology. .NET Erosion from the Client Side There are good reasons why Java is th... (more)

AJAX, Java, Flash, and .NET

Enterprise Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) are the next evolution of business application development. There are four different approaches to RIA development - AJAX, Java, Flash, and .NET - and many different RIA solutions available today. This article answers the following questions: What are enterprise RIAs? Which approach should you use? Which solutions are appropriate for you? And how are RIAs being adopted today? Welcome to a New Paradigm The Web began as an environment for content sharing and small-scale data transfer via e-mail, newsgroups, and so forth. These initial use... (more)